OSAH NEWS, October-November 2013

Topic under: Court News

OSAH Legal Assistants attend Administrative Professionals Conference.

IMG_0472 Legal Assistants Jenna Judy, Hazel Jackson, Kevin Westray, Victoria Hightower IMG_0481 Legal Assistants Jenna Judy, Virginia Ramsey, Hazel Jackson, Kevin Westray, Victoria Hightower, Valerie Ruff, Gloria McDonald

In October 2013, OSAH’s Legal Assistants Valerie Ruff, Hazel Jackson, Kevin Westray, Gloria McDonald, Victoria Hightower, Virginia Ramsey, and Jenna Judy attended the Annual Administrative Professionals Conference. The agenda included the following topics: leadership skills, office technology, problem solving skills, organizational skills, management relations, and negotiation skills. The conference was held in downtown Atlanta.

Judge David Langston recognized at the Annual Child Support Conference.

IMG_1317Judge Michael Malihi, Child Support Director Tanguler Gray-Johnson, Judge David Langston, Communications Director Garry Diggers IMG_1379State Operations Director Patricia Smith, Judge David Langston, Judge Michael Malihi, Keynote Speaker Dr. Bill Self IMG_1307Senior Assistant Attorney General Mark Cicero, Judge Michael Malihi, Judge David Langston

On November 15, 2013, Judge David Langston was recognized at the Georgia Child Support Conference for his exemplary work. Judge Langston has adjudicated more than 10,000 child support cases in Atlanta and Dalton during the past two years, eliminating the backlog. Judge Langston was honored for designing an efficient case management system. Judge Langston conducts hearings in Atlanta, Dalton, Lafayette and Columbus, Georgia.

OSAH Judges Speak at Environmental Law Section Meeting.

IMG_1201
Judge Amanda Baxter, Judge Kim Schroer, Staff Attorney Shoshana Elon
IMG_1293 IMG_1208
Judge Kim Schroer, Judge Amanda Baxter

Judges Kim Schroer and Amanda Baxter were the guest speakers at the November 2013 Luncheon for the Environmental Law Section of the State Bar of Georgia. Judges Schroer and Baxter provided an overview of OSAH and the current case statistics, with an emphasis on the numbers and types of environmental cases that OSAH has handled over the past five years. Further, the judges discussed helpful tips for practicing before OSAH, focuing on environmental-specific recommendations. Section members and judges participated in an open-dialogue regarding a range of topics, including the use of written direct, revisions to the Open Records Act, and the agency referral process.

OSAH judges attend Georgia State University College of Law event.

Networking Reception2
Judge Michael Malihi and Brittanie Browning of Georgia State Law School

 In October 2013, Judges Michael Malihi, Kristen Miller, and Kimberly Schroer, along with staff attorneys Shoshana Elon and Laurin McDonald, attended a Networking Reception for students at Georgia State University’s College of Law. The event was planned by two former OSAH Summer Law Clerks, Lindsey Allison and Brittanie Browning of Georgia State Law School. In addition to OSAH judges and attorneys, Atlanta practitioners from non-profits, family law, bankruptcy law, and intellectual property law were also in attendance. The event was designed to give law students the opportunity to learn valuable career advice and gain a better understanding of various practice areas. Organizers are hoping to make the networking reception an annual event in an effort to give law students greater opportunity to interact and connect with Atlanta practitioners before graduation.

OSAH attorneys attend UGA Law’s Symposium.

Nov 2013 Justice Stevens' talk

Judge Michael Malihi and OSAH staff attorneys Laurin McDonald, Dominic Capraro, and Shoshana Elon, attended the annual Georgia Law Review Symposium, held November 6, 2013, at the University of Georgia School of Law.  The day-long Symposium, which hosted three panel discussions, was entitled “The Press and the Constitution 50 Years after New York Times v. Sullivan.”  The highlight of the program was a presentation by retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens on the pitfalls of using originalism as a method of constitutional interpretation.